Category: Residential Cleaning

20 Aug 2021
indoor air quality

Indoor Air Quality – A Guide Toward Improving

Indoor air quality plays a vital role in our health and quality of life. According to the Environmental Protection Agency, Americans spend on average 90% of their lives indoors where concentrations of some pollutants are 2-5 times higher than they in the great outdoors. People who are most susceptible to the adverse effects of poor air quality (the elderly, the very young, and those with respiratory disease) tend to spend more time indoors than others. With these facts in mind, it is easy to see why indoor air quality matters.

Impacts of Poor Air Quality

Poor indoor air quality is the source of many health problems, from irritation of the eyes, nose, and throat to headaches, dizziness, and fatigue. It is known to cause asthma attacks (especially in children) and is associated with adult-onset asthma, respiratory disease, cardiovascular disease, and cancer.

In workplaces and schools, these impacts often result in poor concentration, reduced productivity, increases in absenteeism, and added healthcare costs.

Improving Indoor Air Quality With Proper Cleaning

There are many pollutants that cause foul air in indoor environments from dust and pet dander to insecticides, paints, and even cleaning supplies. Many of the pollutants found indoors originate outside and are inadvertently brought into a building on the shoes and clothing of occupants. One of the most important steps you can take to improve indoor air quality is to use proper cleaning techniques.

Cleaning Guide

  • Using entryway mats (both indoors and out) to help trap dirt, dust, and other pollutants that are hitching a ride on peoples’ shoes is a great start. Of course, in order for the mats to remain effective, they need to be cleaned regularly.
  • Use cleaning chemicals properly. Many cleaning chemicals contain pollutants (including volatile organic compounds) which are released into the air when sprayed. You can reduce the impact these chemicals have on indoor air quality by adjusting spray bottles to stream rather than mist and by spraying on a cleaning cloth rather than directly on the surface to be cleaned.
  • Keep restrooms, kitchens, and breakrooms clean. These areas are often home to food particles, spills, organic pollutants, and standing water, all of which can produce molds and mildews that adversely affect indoor air quality. Food particles and spills when left unattended can introduce pests to your indoor environment which can lead to increased use of pesticides.
  • Using microfiber cloths and mops can also help to improve indoor air quality. Traditional mops and cleaning cloths have a tendency to spread dirt around, leaving it to become airborne once it dries. Microfiber traps the dirt and removes it. Be sure that your cleaning equipment is properly cleaned after each use.
  • Vacuum regularly with a HEPA filter equipped vacuum. Textiles like carpets and upholstery trap dirt, dust, and bacteria. In fact, your carpet can hold up to 200,000 bacteria per square inch! Frequent vacuuming of rugs, carpets, and upholsteries removes much of this debris and HEPA filtering insures that it is not re-released into the air.
  • Use ‘green’ cleaning products and techniques. Green cleaning products are less toxic than traditional cleaning chemicals and most are free of volatile chemical compounds. Switching to green cleaning chemicals and green cleaning procedures can have a profound impact on indoor air quality. In a study performed by the EPA at a Washington DC elementary school switching to green cleaning chemicals and procedures, reduced airborne dust inside the building by 52%, volatile organic chemical (VOC) concentrations decreased by 49%, bacteria decreased by 40%, and fungi colony-forming units decreased by 61%.

Need Help With Your Indoor Air Quality?

Need help developing a cleaning program to improve indoor air quality in your home or workplace? Complete Care Maintenance can help you to develop an effective policy for controlling indoor air pollution, which can help improve the overall health of employees and family members, improve productivity, and reduce healthcare costs.

 

10 Aug 2021
cleaning products

Common Cleaning Products You Should Never Mix

Let’s start with a simple rule of thumb: Never mix cleaning products!

Whether you are cleaning in a commercial environment or tidying up around the house, cleaning thoroughly typically involves a variety of cleaning products. No one cleaning product works well for every surface and the typical cleaning product inventory contains enough chemicals to make your head spin – literally.

Even seemingly similar products designed for the same purpose often utilize different chemicals to achieve their objectives. These chemicals when mixed with other chemicals can cause some pretty serious chemical reactions. In most cases, these chemical reactions result in the formation of gases, many of which are detrimental to your health. In other cases, these chemical reactions can result in small explosions, which again, are not good for anybody.

Bleach is a cleaning product found in virtually every household and it is far and away one of the most dangerous products in common use today. If you are considering mixing bleach with anything other than water, think again. Bleach is especially toxic and it makes our list several times when combined with other cleaning products.

Still, bleach is not the only culprit. There are many combinations of cleaning products that can cause you great bodily harm. Read on to learn more.

Common Cleaning Products That Don’t Mix

 

Bleach and Ammonia – You may have heard about this nasty combination. A mixture of bleach and ammonia creates a chemical reaction that results in the formation of chloramine gas which generates acid in the lungs and can be deadly. Even moderate exposure to chloramine gas can cause chest pain and shortness of breath. If you are experiencing these symptoms, we encourage you to seek medical attention immediately.

It is important to note that many cleaning products contain bleach and many other cleaning products contain ammonia. This is why we began this article with the ‘Never mix cleaning products!’ rule of thumb. Glass cleaners, oven cleaners, and even ordinary dish liquids may contain ammonia or other chemicals that react badly with bleach.

Hydrogen Peroxide and Vinegar – This one may surprise you. After all, hydrogen peroxide and vinegar both seem pretty harmless. Right? When used by themselves these two common cleaning products are relatively harmless. However, when the two are mixed, they form peracetic acid. Peracetic acid is corrosive and while it may not kill you, it may damage the surfaces you are applying it to.

Drain Cleaners and Other Drain Cleaners – Mixing two different drain cleaners is an easy mistake to make. First drain cleaner doesn’t clear the drain, go to the store and buy a stronger one. Right? Wrong! Different drain cleaners often use different chemical combinations to achieve their goal of clearing the hairball from your drain. These different chemical combinations can result in the formation of toxic gases and in some cases may cause an explosion. So, if your hairball needs an extra dose, be sure to buy the exact same cleaner you used for the first attack.

Bleach and Drain Cleaners – If you are still struggling with that hairball after two doses of drain cleaner, do not reach for a jug of bleach for your third attack. A mixture of bleach and drain cleaner can produce chlorine gas which can have long-lasting effects and may require medical attention. It might be time to call a plumber instead.

Bleach and Vinegar – Bleach and vinegar is another chemical combination that produces chlorine gas. Symptoms you might experience from inhaling this toxin are burning eyes, a burning sensation in your throat, coughing, and difficulty breathing.

Rubbing Alcohol and Bleach – As you can see, bleach is a partner in many bad chemical reactions when mixing cleaning products. When mixed with rubbing alcohol it produces chloroform and chloroacetone, both of which are toxic. According to chemist Alexander Lu of Dong Research Group, “Chloroform can be used to knock people unconscious, and it is suspected to cause cancer. Chloroacetone is no better, having been used as tear gas in World War I.”

Need Help With Your Residential or Commercial Cleaning?

Complete Care Maintenance offers a variety of commercial and residential cleaning services. Our professional cleaning crews are well versed in the chemicals used in commercial cleaning products and we always follow strict safety protocols. Give us a call to learn how we can help!

 

 

30 Jul 2021
carpet cleaning

Carpet Cleaning – 5 Gross Reasons to Hire a Professional

Even if you vacuum your carpets on a regular basis there are still some pretty nasty things hiding in those carpet fibers. According to microbiologist Dr. Philip Tierno of NYU Langone Medical Center, carpet can contain a shocking 200,000 bacteria per square inch. That’s more than your toilet seat! While regular vacuuming can help, nothing works as well as professional carpet cleaning.

So, What’s Hiding In Your Carpets?

GERMS AND BACTERIA

As was noted above, your carpets can contain more bacteria than the average toilet seat. Most of these bacteria arrive via the footwear that you wear every day. The University of Arizona conducted a study that investigated germs collected on footwear. Participants of the study averaged a staggering 421,000 units of bacteria on the outside of the shoe, and 2,887 on the inside. While most of this bacteria stays on your footwear, a great deal of it ends up in your carpet.

Most of these bacteria are harmless but the study found some pretty nasty stuff in this bacterial soup. E. coli, known to cause intestinal and urinary tract infections, meningitis, and diarrhea; Serratia ficari, which can cause infections in both the respiratory tract and wounds; and Klebsiella pneumoniae, known to cause wound and bloodstream infections as well as pneumonia – just to name a few.

DEAD SKIN CELLS

The average human sheds 1.5 million skin cells each day. Multiply that by the number of people in your home or office and you can quickly see how it piles up. While the thought of dead skin cells piling up in your carpet is creepy enough, the real problem is the dust mites that feed on them. Dust mite waste is a leading cause of indoor allergies, a major problem for allergy sufferers, and a prime suspect in the onset of childhood asthma.

ANIMAL FECES

That’s right. We said animal feces. In the study conducted at the University of Arizona, 96% of participants were found to have fecal bacteria on their shoes. It turns out that even if we are careful to avoid stepping in poop, somehow we still do. What is worse is that the transfer rate of bacteria from shoes to your carpets is a staggering ninety to ninety-nine percent.

BUGS (LOTS OF THEM)

A study published in the journal PeerJ found that a large number of tiny animals — arthropods — are taking up residence in modern human dwellings. In 50 houses in and around Raleigh, N. C., the research team found about a hundred different species of arthropods in each home. Carpeted dwellings were found to harbor more bugs than non-carpeted buildings and in addition to the live critters, there were hundreds of dead ones as well.

MOLD

Mold requires four things in order to thrive: moisture, oxygen, a food source, and a surface to grow on. The carpeting in homes and offices can provide a suitable environment for mold to thrive if conditions are right. Basement carpets, carpets in areas of high humidity, and carpets that have been wet are at especially high risk for mold growth.

Mold produces allergens as well as irritants and potentially toxic substances known as mycotoxins. Exposure to mold can cause allergic reactions, skin irritation, and asthma attacks in those with asthma.

How Professional Carpet Cleaning Can Help

Routine deep cleanings of your carpets can go a long way toward reducing the number of nasties that thrive in your carpets. Professional carpet cleaning utilizes high-pressure injection and extraction equipment that removes most foreign material from your carpets. If you would like to learn more about how professional carpet cleaning services can refresh your home or office, call on the pros at Complete Care Maintenance.

 

20 Jun 2021
green cleaning

Green Cleaning: Why It Matters

With ever-growing concerns about the state of our natural environment individuals across the globe are intent on making smarter, more environmentally sound decisions. From eating veggie burgers and recycling plastics to driving electric vehicles and reducing waste – going green is the in thing to do! People have come to the realization that their actions can negatively impact the environment and many are making lifestyle changes in an effort to contribute less to the problem and more to the solution. One such lifestyle change is switching to green cleaning products.

What Is Wrong With Traditional Cleaning Products?

Let’s face it, we all want clean and healthy homes and workplaces. Traditional cleaning products have been helping us to achieve this goal for a very long time. In fact, they are so ingrained in our culture that many of us still use the same cleaning products that our parents and grandparents used. If it was good enough for grandma, it should be good enough for us, right?

What grandma did not know is that many of the chemicals in traditional cleaning products are both detrimental to our health and the health of the environment. Many of the chemicals used in traditional cleaning products are caustic, can cause eye, nose, throat, and skin irritation, and have been linked to early-onset asthma in children. According to the Environmental Protection Agency, of the more than 2.1 million janitorial workers in the U.S., 6% suffered workplace injuries due to chemical exposure. Long-term studies have shown that some chemicals contained in commercial cleaning products can be linked to cancer, depressed nervous systems, and birth defects.

Common Chemical Culprits

While the health risks associated with traditional cleaning products are low, and in many cases are outweighed by the benefits they provide, the impact on the environment can be much more severe. Several common chemicals used in traditional cleaning products have been identified as having negative environmental impacts.

  • Ammonia – Ammonia is an air pollutant and a major source of nitrogen oxide which is toxic for plants and the animals that eat them.
  • Triclosan – Triclosan is an anti-microbial commonly found in household detergents, anti-bacterial soaps, and other disinfectants. Of the household products that contain Triclosan, 96% of the chemical volume gets washed down the drain and eventually ends up in rivers, lakes, and streams. Some by-products of Triclosan (Dioxins) have been proven to cause cancer as well as immense developmental issues in almost every vertebrate species. Triclosan has been found in 57.6% of all rivers and streams tested in the U.S.
  • Bleach – Sodium hydroxide (Household Bleach) is commonly used for washing clothes, cleaning toilets, and unclogging drains which means it is typically poured directly into wastewater and can not be filtered out. Bleach forms chlorinated organic compounds, including known carcinogens that are absorbed by organisms and enter the food chain.
  • Phosphates – Phosphates are commonly used in household detergents and are known to cause eutrophication which spurs excessive algae growth. Eutrophication is the prime suspect for large algae blooms that cause red tide. Large algae blooms absorb huge amounts of oxygen from the water and can kill off entire marine ecosystems.

How Green Cleaning Products Help the Environment

  1. Green cleaning products are biodegradable, meaning that they do not persist in the environment. The longer any foreign compound or chemical persists in the environment, the more likely it is to have negative effects.
  2. Green products have low toxicity. Less toxic chemicals are much safer for plants and animals and because they are biodegradable, they are far less likely to enter or persist in the food chain.
  3. Green cleaning products have low VOC content. VOC stands for Volatile Organic Compounds. Some VOCs are dangerous to human health or cause harm to the environment. Most VOCs are not acutely toxic but may have long-term chronic health effects.
  4. Most green cleaning products are shipped with minimal or sustainable packaging meaning that their production is less impactful on the environment.

How To Find Green Cleaning Products

Despite the increased popularity of green cleaning products, they can be difficult to identify. Many cleaning product manufacturers use labels that imply environmentally conscious ingredients, but may still contain harmful chemicals. To ensure that you are buying green cleaning products you should look for the seal of approval from one of the following third-party certification authorities.

  • Green Seal –  Green Seal is a non-profit, green cleaning certification authority that has been around since 1989. They evaluate the entire life-cycle of cleaning products to ensure that they meet both independent and international standards.
  • Safer Choice – Safer Choice is the Environmental Protection Agency’s (E.P.A.) certification program for green products and is designed to help individuals and businesses find products that are safer for human health and the environment.
  • ECOLOGO – ECOLOGO certifications are provided by Underwriters Laboratories, a company that has been developing safety standards for more than a century. ECOLOGO certifies products, services, and packaging for reduced environmental impact.

Need Help With Your Green Cleaning Initiatives?

Complete Care Maintenance is New Jersey’s leading commercial cleaning service provider with years of experience developing and utilizing green cleaning programs for businesses of all shapes and sizes. Call or contact us today to learn how we can help you go green!

01 Jun 2021
cross-contamination

Avoid Cross-Contamination When Cleaning

Oftentimes the spread of germs is facilitated by cross-contamination. Cross-contamination is defined as the transfer of bacteria or other microorganisms from one substance to another. Surprisingly, cross-contamination often occurs as a result of cleaning. While this may sound counter-intuitive, poor cleaning practices are a major source of cross-contamination. Professional cleaning companies recognize this fact and put in place procedures and protocols that are designed to mitigate the risk of cross-contamination.

How To Avoid Cross-Contamination When Cleaning

Use Smart Cleaning Processes – Putting cleaning processes in place helps ensure that cleaning duties are performed in a consistent manner. Smart cleaning processes take into consideration the risk of cross-contamination and focuses on taking steps to prevent it.

  1. Always start with a clean pair of gloves and fresh cleaning equipment.
  2. Clean one area at a time.
  3. Always clean from top to bottom, wiping down surfaces with an effective cleaning solution.
  4. Spray disinfectant on all high-touch surfaces like desks, phones, doorknobs and push plates, elevator buttons, counters, railings, and all bathroom surfaces, following manufacturer recommendations for saturation and dwell time.
  5. Finally, clean the floor starting from an inside corner and working your way toward the exit.
  6. Place cleaning cloths, mop heads, and other used cleaning tools in a plastic bag and dispose of your gloves when you finish.
  7. Repeat this process for every area that you clean, never using the same cleaning cloths, mop heads, etc.

Color Code Your Cleaning Supplies – Color coding cleaning supplies is an excellent way to reduce cross-contamination. For instance, always having ample supplies of cleaning cloths in pre-defined colors can help cleaning crews avoid using the same cloth in two distinctly different areas. A simple color-coding system might look like this:

  • Red – Red cloths and equipment marked in red are designated for high-risk areas like toilets and urinals.
  • Yellow – Yellow cloths and equipment are designated for medium-risk surfaces like restroom sinks and countertops.
  • Green –  Green is designated for lower-risk areas such as office areas and non-prep food surfaces.
  • Blue – Blue cleaning supplies are reserved for low-risk surfaces like glass and mirrors.

With a color-coded system like this, you can avoid you can mitigate cross-contamination and more easily monitor workers to ensure they are following protocols.

Choose The Right Tools –  Choosing microfiber over traditional cloths and mop heads is a big step forward in reducing cost-contamination. Traditional cleaning cloths and mop heads are made from absorbent cotton fiber. One study conducted by the University of California Davis Medical Center in collaboration with the EPA that traditional wet loop mops reduced bacteria by 30%, while microfiber mop heads showed a 99% reduction in bacteria.

Microfiber traps bacteria in the fibers of the mop while wet loop mops capture bacteria in the water molecules. Every time a wet loop mop gets dunked in a body of water the bacteria are released, only to be redistributed on the surface being cleaned. Microfiber employs positively charged particles to trap dust particles which is where the bacteria hide. It is a much more effective method for removing bacteria from surfaces.

Like microfiber Hepa filters do a better job of trapping dust particles that harbor germs and bacteria. Traditional vacuums typically employ a cotton or polyester fiber filter that fails to hold the dust as well as the fiberglass and charcoal found in a Hepa filter. Selecting a Hepa filter vacuum will help reduce the risk of cross-contamination.

Segregate Cleaning Staff – Assigning designated staff members to areas throughout your facility is a great way to mitigate cross-contamination. Allowing the same individual to clean the restroom and the kitchen can easily create cross-contamination concerns.

People, whether they realize it or not can collect and carry germs and bacteria on their clothing, shoes, hands, and hair. Limiting cleaning crew staff to designated areas helps to reduce the risk of transmission.

Employ A Commercial Cleaning Company – A well-organized and well-managed commercial cleaning company will already have these protocols and procedures in place. They will be fully versed in the use of proper chemicals and equipment, and they understand how to clean and disinfect virtually any surface.

 

 

 

27 Jun 2020
cold fog disinfection

Cold Fog Disinfecting

 

COLD FOG SANITIZING AND DISINFECTING SERVICES

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COLD FOGGING FOR COMPLETE DISINFECTING AND SANITIZING
SERVING ALL OF NEW JERSEY

With the Covid-19 pandemic still wreaking havoc, businesses across the globe are looking for ways to effectively clean and disinfect their facilities. While traditional cleaning and disinfecting processes are still essential, the current viral outbreak demands even more stringent measures. Cold fogging with proper disinfectants is the method of choice for companies seeking a more thorough disinfecting and sanitizing solution. Cold fogging is a process where a disinfectant is put into a machine and atomized into the air. Unlike a spray, a fog saturates the air in a mist and covers every surface in the room. Even hard to reach areas that are typically overlooked with traditional cleaning methods become saturated with a disinfecting fog, effectively killing bacteria, viruses, and germs. Proven effective against influenza, flu, norovirus and SARS.

Licensed To Kill

Disinfecting

The disinfectants used in the cold fogging process are EPA registered to be effective against hard to kill viruses like Covid-19. In addition, these high-level disinfectants kill a huge variety of other viruses, bacteria, and germs as well as mold, dust mites, and fungi. Because the disinfectant remains on surfaces for an extended period of time before breaking down into inert byproducts, it continues disinfecting long after the initial fogging.

Safe Sanitization

Safe Sanitizing

Ultra-Low Volume (ULV) cold fogging is a non-toxic, non-corrosive, and non-caustic process that can sanitize an entire room quickly and efficiently. It is safe for use on virtually any surface including fabrics, draperies, glass, wood, stone, and porous and semi-porous surfaces. It is even approved by the FDA for use in food preparation areas and will not stain clothing or fabrics. ULV cold fogging is a safe and effective sanitation you can trust.

Commercial And Residential Solutions

Disinfectant Fog

Complete Care Maintenance offers disinfecting fogging services for both commercial and residential customers. From multi-family apartment complexes and single family homes to hotels, schools, fitness centers, salons, restaurants, and retail stores. We can sanitize and disinfect virtually any business or residence quickly and efficiently. Call on Complete Care Maintenance for all of your disinfecting and sanitizing needs.

COLD FOG DISINFECTING F.A.Q.

Cold fogging is a process by which liquid disinfectant is atomized, turning it into a fine mist. This creates droplets that are so small that they actually float for a period of time before settling on surfaces. Because of this airborne quality, cold fogging is able to reach areas that typically are overlooked, literally saturating an entire room with disinfectant.

Category: Cold Fogging

Cold fogging is one of the most effective methods of disinfection because it reaches areas that are normally overlooked. The chemicals used in our cold fogging process will kill 99.99% of bacteria, germs, and viruses.

Category: Cold Fogging

Yes, cold fogging is safe. The chemicals used are non-toxic, non-corrosive, and non-caustic. It is safe for use on virtually any surface and is even approved by the FDA for use in food preparation areas.

Category: Cold Fogging

Typically a room can be occupied almost immediately after cold fogging (about 10-15 minutes).

Category: Cold Fogging

Yes. We encourage after-hours cold fogging as it allows the disinfectant fog to fully dry.

Category: Cold Fogging

No. The thin mist that is applied dries fairly quickly and spaces can be occupied and surfaces used almost immediately. Usually 10 to 15 minutes after application.

Category: Cold Fogging

No. The cold fogging process is safe for use on virtually and surface. It will not damage furniture or stain fabrics.

Category: Cold Fogging

Yes. Unlike deodorizers and air fresheners that simply mask odors, cold fogging kills the bacteria that causes the odor.

Category: Cold Fogging

No. It is always recommended that you maintain a regular cleaning and disinfection routine. Cold fogging does disinfect hard to reach areas that are often neglected during regular cleaning regimens.

Category: Cold Fogging

Yes. The chemical used in our cold fogging process are known to kill cold and flu viruses. It is also effective against most known viruses and pathogens.

Category: Cold Fogging

The novel coronavirus known as Covid-19 is a new strain of a known virus. While there is currently no studies to prove the effectiveness of cold fogging on Covid-19, it has been proven to eradicate other coronavirus strains and is presumed to be just as effective on Covid-19.

Category: Cold Fogging

Yes. We recommend residential cold fogging particularly in homes that have been impacted by Covid-19 or other viruses. Post-infection fogging will help to eliminate any residual virus and make your home safe again.

Category: Cold Fogging

Who We Serve

  • Office Spaces
  • Restaurants
  • Retail Stores
  • Pharmacies
  • Medical Offices
  • Dental Offices
  • Warehouses
  • Municipal Buildings
  • Fitness Centers
  • Schools | Dormatories
  • Banks | Credit Unions
  • Hotels | Motels
  • Hair/Nail Salons
  • Multi-family Housing
  • Single Family Homes
  • Factories | Plants

And so much more!

 

Call Us @ 1(609) 275-8227

04 Jun 2020
green cleaning

Going green and clean: Top eco-friendly commercial kitchen and office cleaning tips

Office and Commercial kitchen and cafeteria cleaning don’t need to be back-breaking, noxious-smelling activities to be feared. In this article, we’ll give you some advice on office cleaners, commercial green cleaning products, and go through some ways to save the environment at work.

disinfecting

We’ll look at:

  • Traditional office and kitchen cleaning supplies
  • Eco-friendly cleaning products
  • The power of steam cleaning
  • The pros and cons of the DIY eco cleaner
  • Deep kitchen cleaning checklist
  • Office cleaning tips
  • Other ways to go eco-friendly in the office

 

Read on to discover how to go green and join other eco-friendly businesses that are helping save the environment.

 

Keeping your kitchen and office clean and tidy is a basic business health and safety requirement. It’s necessary to help keep your employees and customers happy and healthy. There are expert teams out there who specialise in professional kitchen cleaning and office cleaning so you can be confident you’re meeting all the guidelines. But if you’re looking for ways to be green about your cleaning, it may be a good idea to talk to them about the chemicals and equipment they’re using in your workplace.

 

Traditional office and kitchen cleaning supplies

While effective and excellent at killing germs and viruses, a lot of the harsh chemicals used to clean professional workspaces are bad for the environment. Some even contain phosphates, which can be harmful to aquatic life. Others use hydrocarbons and compressed gas, which is terrible for air pollution and global warming. And that’s not even taking into account the single-use plastic and packaging that a lot of these come in.

 

Having a conversation with your kitchen and office cleaners about sourcing more environmentally-friendly cleaning supplies and methods is a simple way you can go green and clean.

 

Eco-friendly cleaning products

People can be sceptical about sanitising offices and cleaning kitchens with green products, but they’re just as effective at removing dirt, grime and bacteria. Swapping to eco cleaners is the first (and easiest) step you can take in your ‘how to be greener’ journey. And what’s great is that there are loads of products out there that fit the bill, such as degreasers, surface cleansers, and even washroom supplies.

 

Using more products like these is responsible, effective and good for the environment.

 

The power of steam cleaning

When it comes to kitchen cleaning and sanitizing, there are so many extra spaces you have to consider. Ceilings can become caked in grease, kitchen ducting can harbour dust, and grates, drains, and sinks can start to smell so much sooner thanks to the fat and food waste siphoned away.

 

There’s a lot of potential for bacteria in a kitchen, so regular deep cleans are necessary to help avoid customer illness and keep your business compliant with all regulations. But these deep cleans don’t need to be full of harsh chemicals and commercial green cleaning products – Steam cleaning is one of the best ways to be green and clean.

 

Steam Cleaners can reach temperatures between 66-149° C, so they’re certainly hot enough to kill germs, melt grease and remove a multitude of stains with zero scrubbing. And there’s not a chemical or cleaning agent in sight. You can steam clean your floors, surfaces, and appliances. They’re ideal for those out-of-reach places too. Just be careful not to use them on anything porous or prone to heat damage.

 

The pros and cons of the DIY eco cleaner

In your eco-friendly cleaner research, you’re sure to come across some do-it-yourself cleaning solution recipes. Vinegar sprays, lemon juice, bicarbonate of soda solutions – they’re all well-known for their home-cleaning prowess, but are they suitable for use in commercial kitchens and offices?

 

They’re certainly effective, but having overwhelming vinegar and lemony smells in a kitchen could be confusing for cooks. You need to take into account the time some of these take to work. Some bicarbonate of soda oven-cleaning hacks need overnight soaking to break down stains.

 

Using pantry staples may seem like a low-cost, eco-friendly option for cleaning your kitchen and office, but you’ve got to consider the time spent, any leftover scents, and overall effectiveness. Professionally-produced cleaning products are thoroughly checked for their efficiency – can you say the same for your homemade vinegar/bicarb solution?

 

Deep kitchen cleaning checklist

To help you stay on top of it and to keep those germs at bay – here’s a kitchen cleaning to-do list of things to consider and areas you shouldn’t forget:

  • Think about introducing rubber mats to trap dirt and runaway food – Brush and clean these daily
  • Sweep and mop the floors with eco cleaners, degreasers and disinfectants
  • Clean high-traffic touchpoints like door handles, switches, etc. daily
  • Don’t forget hard-to-reach and inaccessible areas such as ceilings, lighting, shelving, etc.
  • Keeping all your appliances clean will improve efficiency – don’t forget to scrub those seals and shelves
  • Clean the kitchen vents and kitchen ducting regularly.
  • Give the rubbish and recycling bins a clean to reduce smells

 

Office cleaning tips

Offices aren’t as high-maintenance as a commercial kitchen, but there are areas which need special attention as well:

  • Introducing rubber kitchen mats or rugs will trap dirt and spills – you can buy machine-washable ones for ease of use
  • Clean high traffic touchpoints like door handles, switches and desks daily
  • Vacuum regularly and thoroughly clean carpets at least once per year – consider a steam carpet cleaner as a green alternative
  • Keep the fridge and other communal appliances clean to improve efficiency and longevity
  • Clean the inside and outside of the bins to reduce unwelcome smells
  • Encourage staff to keep with workspaces clean. This includes keyboards, monitors, and other equipment.

 

Other ways to go eco-friendly in the office

As well as making your cleaning greener, there are other ways to help the environment at work. For example, adding some plants and greenery to office spaces – they’re great for increasing oxygen levels and they create a welcoming atmosphere. To reduce the use of energy and encourage natural light, keep your windows clean both inside and out. And you could get some recycling bins and only choose reusable cups and plates.

 

Banishing paper towels is another great option – microfibre towels are super absorbent and you can get loads of different kinds of low-energy hand-dryers these days. You should also consider smarter dispensers and sensor taps – they’re much more hygienic and reduce water consumption too.

 

There are so many different ways you can help the environment and keep your commercial kitchens and offices clean, all you need to do is take that first step.